Validation_of_LC-MS_Methods_Online_CourseWe are glad to announce that the third edition of the online course LC-MS Method Validation is open for registration at the address https://sisu.ut.ee/lcms_method_validation/ !

The course will be offered as a Massive Open On-line Course (MOOC) during Nov 27, 2018 – Feb 08, 2019.

This is a practice-oriented on-line course on validation of analytical methods, specifically using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) as technique, mostly (but not limited to) using the electrospray (ESI) ion source. The course will also be of interest to chromatographists using other detector types. The course introduces the main concepts and mathematical apparatus of validation, covers the most important method performance parameters and ways of estimating them. The course is largely based on the recently published two-part tutorial review:

The course materials include lectures, practical exercises and numerous tests for self-testing. In spite of being introductory, the course intends to offer sufficient knowledge and mathematical skills for carrying out validation for most of the common LC-MS analyses in routine laboratory environment. The real-life analysis situations for which there are either examples or self-tests are for example determination of pesticides in fruits and vegetables, perfluoroalkyl acids in water, antibiotics in blood serum, glyphosate and AMPA in surface water, etc. It is important to stress, that for successful validation practical experience – both in analytical chemistry as such and also specifically in validation – is crucial and this can be acquired only through hands-on laboratory work, which cannot be offered via an on-line course.

Participation in the course is free of charge. Receiving digital certificate (in the case of successful completion) is also free of charge. Printed certificate (to be sent by post) is available for a fee of 60 EUR. Registration is possible until the start of the course. The course material is available from the above address all the time and can be used via web by anyone who wishes to improve the knowledge and skills in analytical method validation (especially when using LC-ESI-MS).

 

Recently the Analytical chemistry group of University of Tartu participated in a cutting-edge research endeavor: characterizing the acidity of some extremely efficient strongly acidic organocatalysts. In the case of the Mukaiyama aldol reaction the best of them (1) worked at low ppm to sub-ppm level, (2) gave excellent yields and (3) high enantiomeric selectivity as well as (4) turnover numbers (TON numbers) of hundreds of thousands (Nature Chemistry 2018, 10, 888-894).

The extent to which these four features occurred together in the same catalyst was so remarkable that the results were published in one of the most prestigious journals in chemical sciences: Nature Chemistry.

The extremely demanding acidity measurements were performed by Dr Karl Kaupmees using the unique non-aqueous acid-base chemistry facility that the group is running. The whole research project was led by the group of professor Benjamin List – a worldwide known guru in the field of strongly acidic catalysts working at the Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung.
These results are expected to open new avenues in development of powerful new organocatalysts.

(Photo by Andres Tennus: Karl doing acidity measurements in a glovebox under anhydrous conditions)

On September 6, 2018 the master thesis defence took place at University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 (UCBL). Dmitriy Chikhirev, Abhishek Sonu, Malika Beishanova and Marco Bertic (left to right on the photo) successfully defended their master’s theses!

Congratulations to all of you!

As is typical for the Lyon study track, the topics of the theses were very practical and linked to industrial interests – applications of spectroscopy in industrial process control, on-line chromatographic systems, advanced sensor technology, etc. This choice of topics and the long-standing industrial collaboration are rooted in the world-famous industrial analysis and control study direction at UCBL led by prof. Jérôme Randon.

 

This week is the first study week for the new students of Applied Measurement Science and EACH Erasmus Mundus Joint Programme. Altogether 27 students started their studies. This is the largest joint number of students of these two programmes.

As a result of the rather large number of students, the countries of origin of the students are also very diverse: Vietnam, Philippines, Brazil, Estonia, Nepal, Thailand, Peru, India, Netherlands, Fiji, Albania, Nigeria, Mexico, Kazakhstan, Egypt, Ukraine, Pakistan and Turkey. And for the first time all six inhabited continents are represented!

During the introductory meeting on Monday 03.09.18 an overview of both programmes was given (see the slides) and a large number of questions were asked and answered, accompanied by tea/coffee and cake. The session ended with an entertaining “get-to-know-each-other” game organized by the tutor Kristi Palk (far left on the photo).

We wish successful studies to all new students!

 

On August 10, 2018 the master thesis defence session of the second of the EACH programme took place at Åbo Akademi University (AAU)! Kenneth Arandia, Changbai Li, Jay Pee Oña and Jayaruwan Gunathilake Gamaethiralalage successfully defended their master’s theses. (first row on the photo, left to right)

Congratulations to all of you!

The defence took place in front of an international jury – Tom Lindfors (Finland), Patrik Eklund (Finland), Johan Bobacka (Finland), AdrianaFerancova (Slovakia/Finland), Ivo Leito (Estonia), Hanno Evard (Estonia). (second row on the photo, right to left, Hanno participated via Skype)

Most of the defended theses focused on development and applications of advanced electrochemical sensing devices – preparation of all-solid-state sensors, solid state reference electrodes, calibration-free potentiometric analytical devices, etc.

Most of the students who defended their theses have already secured either a PhD position or a job in industry.

(Photo: Jayaruwan Gunathilake)

 

A new paper on ancient dietary practices was recently published by our group (led by Dr. Ester Oras) in the Journal of Archaeological Science: “Social food here and hereafter: Multiproxy analysis of gender-specific food consumption in conversion period inhumation cemetery at Kukruse, NE-Estonia”.

We demonstrated the fruitfulness of multiproxy dietary analysis combining plant microfossil, human bone stable isotope and pottery related organic residue analysis. The results reveal that even 800 years ago men and women had different dietary habits: men preferred fish and higher trophic level terrestrial animals (e.g. pork), whilst women declined towards ruminant carcass (a nice steak!) and dairy products.

The paper is one of the few of its kind illustrating ancient food consumption as a highly social phenomenon, and setting an example for microscale dietary analysis in the future.

 

On Saturday 21.07.2018 The MSC Euromaster Summer School 2018 (Tallinn, Estonia) finished. It was the 11th summer school of the Measurement Science in Chemistry consortium. The hallmark of the MSC Summer schools is “learning by doing” and combining learning with fun, meeting new people and sharing experience. The feedback from the Tartu participants is below and it indicates that organizing these Summer schools it is worth the effort!

 

 

 

Angelique Dafun:
MSC Summer School is a great experience to learn and have fun at the same time. It encompasses intensive learning and practical applications of metrology and accreditation that are significant for an analytical chemist in a “learning through play” way. It is an opportunity to gain knowledge from the experts in the field and to learn about the culture of people from different parts of the world. The schedule is tight and a little bit tiring but having an amazing group of people made it really rewarding. With other Filipinos, we dream of having this kind of summer school in our country someday in order to improve our system in analytical measurement.

 

 

Nikola Obradović:
The MSC Summer School is a great opportunity for all those who want hands-on experience in operating a laboratory under ISO/IEC 17025. Through many theoretical and practical exercises, the participant of this course is led through the whole process of method validation. But, the school is not all about studying. There is much networking going on here, with people making friends and partnering up to do new and exciting projects. Thus, for many, the end of the Summer School marks the start of a whole new chapter in their lives. As the moto of school states: “To mesure is a pleasure!”

 

 

Mark Justine Zapanta:
The MSC Summer School provides a great opportunity to deepens one’s knowledge and understanding of measurement science and accreditation in a fun and exciting way. The “learning through play” theme of the School allows participants to apply theories by making them think, design, implement, and evaluate their approach to answer an analytical problem. Outside the walls of the classroom, participants get to broaden their social network as the School is highly diverse with people coming from different cultures and backgrounds and it is the cultural exchange that adds more flavor and spice to the summer school. Attending the MSC Summer School is truly a one of a kind experience!

 

 

Ernesto Zapata Flores:
Well, it was more than the expected, I mean I met people from different countries around the world, from Ghana, Myanmar, Ireland, Belgium, Portugal, etc. I made a lot of friends. By the other side, there were some topics that I had learned at the University of Tartu, but others were completely new to me. The Professors had an excellent attitude towards us. It was an extremely good experience, the group work gave a lot of stress but it was exciting because of sharing points of view with people from different backgrounds and countries contributed to enrich not only the project but my own knowledge.

 

 

 

On Sunday 8th July, 38 students from 17 countries made their way to the beautiful city of Tallinn. The round of introductions already told us a lot about the individuals, much more than they intended. On Monday 9th July, armed with a little information and lots of things to think about, from the earlier sessions, the students set off, in their teams, to collect sea water samples (Photo on the left). All managed to complete the task but for some the waters were muddied, in more ways than one. Finding out the next day, Tuesday 10th, that salinity measurements are not trivial was a rich learning experience and shed light on many of the pitfalls awaiting the unsuspecting sampler/analyst.

These issues were then further embedded and clarified in various lectures (parts of the resource or process requirements of the ISO/IEC 17025:2017 namely chapters 7.1, 6.1 to 6.6, 7.1-7.8). Already on Tuesday evening the various laboratories (TEAM ONE, JCPT, K2Y, Cool Lab, Djam, We Click!, Elk Analytical, G.I.M.M., ISO CHEM and MONALU) had clearly defined roles and responsibilities for each of their staff. This was about to be tested when they got started on their measurements in the laboratory on Thursday afternoon, following a review of basic lab skills the day before.

Once in the lab the mixture of more and less experienced people really proved to be invaluable for both. It was really lovely to see the exchange of advice, with younger people sharing their intimate knowledge of software such as excel and what it can do and slightly older people providing perspective on what’s really important with respect to fitness for purpose decisions etc. (Ready for the lab! Photo on the right)

When the students had completed five full days of the summer school and were unwinding a little bit in Mektory’s lovely garden, sharing national food, drink, language tips, jokes, songs, (tall) tales from their countries, the idea of filming a mini ‘TV’ novella on Lab Safety was born. It just shows that free time is needed for creative juices to flow!

Saturday the 14th July was simply amazing. From learning that Estonians were Vikings too and what that actually meant, to learning some basic Viking skills (axe throwing and long bow shooting), followed by a hike to the magical Saula Springs, canoeing or long boat river excursion (Photo on the left) and finally ancient singing and dancing games (intermingled with dinner) left all feeling physically exhausted but mentally refreshed and ready for the World Cup Final on Sunday (preceded by a guided tour of Tallinn) and needless to say, another week of interactive learning.

 

On July 09, 2018 the 11th MSC Summer School started in the Mectory facility of the Tallinn University of Technology (Tallinn, Estonia).

Four students from the University of Tartu take part in the summer school. Three students are from the EACH programme: Angelique Dafun, Mark Justine Zapanta and Nikola Obradović. One student, Ernesto De Jesus Zapata Flores, is from the AMS programme. (Photo on the left, taken by Mark Justine Zapanta)

As in previous years, a core aim of the Summer school is teaching measurement science (metrology) topics related to analytical chemistry using active learning (“learning by doing”) approaches, as far as possible. Thus, efforts are made for increasing the share of discussions, hands-on work, teamwork. A key activity of the summer school is the contest of student teams (setting up virtual laboratories and interacting with customers), which tests their knowledge and skills in all areas of metrology in chemistry (Photo on the right).

We wish exciting and enjoyable Summer school to all participants!

 

Initiated by the University of Tartu analytical chemistry group, the pan-European research network of fundamental pH Research UnipHied started in May 2018.

Why is such network needed? As of now, it is not possible to compare pH values of solutions made in different solvents, as every solvent has its own pH scale. This situation is highly unfortunate, since it causes confusion and inaccuracies into many fields, extending far beyond the specific field of acid-base chemistry. Examples are industrial catalytic processes, food chemistry, liquid chromatograpy, etc. The central goal of UnipHied is to overcome this situation by putting the new theoretical concept of the recently introduced unified pHabs scale on a metrologically well-founded basis into practice.

The most important specific objectives of UnipHied are (1) to develop and validate a reliable and universally applicable measurement procedure that enables the measurement of pHabs; (2) to create a reliable method for the experimental or computational evaluation of the liquid junction potential between aqueous and non-aqueous solutions; (3) to develop a coherent and validated suite of calibration standards for standardizing routine measurement systems in terms of pHabs values for a variety of widespread systems (e.g., industrial mixtures, soils/waters, food products, biomaterials).

The first version of the pHabs measurement procedure has been created by Agnes Heering (Suu) in the framework of her PhD thesis. The main experimental difficulty is evaluation of the liquid junction potential (LJP), which will be thoroughly addressed by UnipHied. The first important steps towards this goal have very recently been made and published as two back-to-back papers: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2018, 57, 2344–2347 and Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2018, 57, 2348–2352
The key achievement described in the papers is finding an ionic liquid, namely [N2225][NTf2], that can be used as salt bridge electrolyte and has such properties that two out of three main sources of LJP are eliminated.

The partners of the UnipHied network are LNE (France, coordinator), BFKH (Hungary), CMI (Czech Republic), DFM (Denmark), IPQ (Portugal), PTB (Germany), SYKE (Finland), TÜBITAK-UME (Turkey), Freiburg University (Germany), ANBSensors (United Kingdom), FCiencias.ID (Portugal), UT (Estonia).

UnipHied is funded from the EMPIR programme (project 17FUN09) co-financed by the Participating States and from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme.